[space]
[space] EEOC 35th Anniversary Logo [space] March for Freedom and Jobs [space] Signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 [space] Protest Sign [space] Children's Art [space]
[space]
[space] History [space] Milestones [space] The Law [space] Voices [space] Visions [space]
[space]

Comments of Raul Yzaguirre

It's a largely unknown, untold story. I'm fond of saying that my organization had its roots with the Mutualista Movement, the Mutual Aid Society movement in the 1800's; the mid- 1800's. This was a struggle to protect ourselves against a lot of injustices and lots of discrimination. First, all over the Southwest and the Midwest; some of those groups still exist. I, personally, was impacted by those kinds of organizations. They formed the framework for a lot of civil rights activities. Also, I often site the fact that there were a lot of killings of our community that have largely been untold. In my own state of Texas, some, perhaps as many as 5,000 of our folks were killed during a period in this century - in this past century, in the early 1900's, that goes largely unnoticed and unreported. The fact that, perhaps as many as one million of our folks were illegally deported back to Mexico or to other places of origin during the Great Depression; that's another story that's largely unknown. And in our legal civil rights, we had great lawyers, who went to the Supreme Court in the late 40's and then early 50's to win civil rights and to desegregate our schools, and much of what they did formed the basis for Brown v. The Board of Education, in 1954; the Supreme Court decision which launched a great civil rights movement. That's a story that, unfortunately, we don't have time to go into in any great detail, but its largely unknown by the American people, and, indeed, by our own community.


35th Anniversary Home EEOC Main Site