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PRESS RELEASE
10-1-18

Interim Healthcare of Wyoming Sued by EEOC For Sex-Based Pay Discrimination

Female Nurses Paid Less Than Less Experienced Male Counterpart, Federal Agency Charges

CASPER, Wyo. - Interim Healthcare of Wyoming violated federal law by paying female nurses lower wages than a significantly less experienced male counterpart because of sex, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) charged in a lawsuit filed on Friday, Sept 28 the agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, the company underpaid the female nurses despite their performing substantially equal work under similar working conditions. Further, despite several complaints about the pay disparity from the female nurses and their male counterpart, Interim failed to take any corrective action, the EEOC said.

Such alleged conduct violates the Equal Pay Act of 1963 and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, both of which prohibit discrimination in compensation on the basis of sex. The EEOC filed suit, EEOC v. Interim Healthcare of Wyoming, Inc., Civil Action No. 2:18-cv-00161-NDF, in U.S. District Court for the District of Wyoming after first attempting to reach a settlement through its pre-litigation conciliation process. The lawsuit seeks back pay damages for lost wages, liquidated damages and punitive damages. The EEOC also seeks appropriate injunctive relief to prevent discriminatory practices in the future.

Enforcement of equal pay laws and targeting compensation systems and practices that discriminate based on gender is one of six national priorities identified by the EEOC's Strategic Enforcement Plan.

"Enforcing the Equal Pay Act and Title VII's prohibition on compensation discrimination are priorities for the EEOC," said EEOC Phoenix District Office Regional Attorney Mary Jo O'Neill. "Enforcement of those laws and closing the pay gap are particularly important in a state like Wyoming, where women make only 77 cents on the dollar compared to men, and which is ranked 39th in the country in pay equity."

Elizabeth Cadle, District Director of EEOC's Phoenix District Office, added, "It's not only unfair when women are paid less than men when they perform substantially equal work under similar working conditions - it's against the law. This case demonstrates that the EEOC can and will take action against employers who fail to rectify a clear sex-based pay disparity."

The EEOC's Phoenix District Office has jurisdiction over Arizona, Colorado, parts of New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming.

The EEOC advances opportunity in the workplace by enforcing federal laws prohibiting employment discrimination. More information is available at www.eeoc.gov. Stay connected with the latest EEOC news by subscribing to our email updates.