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EEOC Sues Feldman Automotive for Religious Discrimination

Dealership Refused to Hire Religious Applicant, Federal  Agency Charged

DETROIT - Feldman Automotive, Inc., a car  dealership with locations throughout metro-Detroit and Lansing, violated  federal law by failing to hire an applicant because of his religion, the U.S.  Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) alleged in a lawsuit filed  today. 

According  to the EEOC's suit, Brandan Allen applied to work as a car salesperson for  Feldman Automotive.  Allen is a religious  member of a non-denominational church, and after learning about his religious  beliefs, Feldman management expressed concerns. For these reasons, the EEOC  said, Feldman denied Allen the job.

Failing or refusing to hire an  applicant because of his or her religion violates Title VII of the Civil Rights  Act of 1964.  The EEOC filed its lawsuit  in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan (EEOC v. Feldman Automotive, Inc., Civil  Case No.: 2:14-cv-13684) after first attempting to reach a pre-litigation  settlement through its conciliation process.   The EEOC's lawsuit seeks back pay, compensatory damages, punitive  damages and reinstatement or front pay for Allen.  The EEOC also seeks injunctive relief --  including a court order prohibiting Feldman from failing or refusing to hire  applicants because of religion in the future.

"Some employers need to learn that  religious discrimination and a 21st-century workplace don't mix,"  said Miles Shultz, trial attorney for the EEOC's Detroit Field Office.  "The EEOC is here to fight for people  unreasonably asked to choose between their faith and a job."

The EEOC enforces federal laws  prohibiting employment discrimination. Further information about the EEOC is  available on its web site at