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Census 2000 Special EEO File Questions and Answers

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

Q: Will the 2000 Special EEO File be available from the Bureau of Census on CD-ROM, as was the 1990 EEO File?

A: The Bureau of Census will not produce a product similar to what was made available from the 1990 Census, because the 2000 Special EEO File is not a standard Census product. However, the Federal Consortium agencies are currently considering options for making the datasets available to the public, such as via the internet or on DVD. Also, the datasets that are created for the Consortium agencies will be made available to those who request it from the Bureau of Census, at the cost of reproduction.

Q: Is the data from the 1990 EEO File or Special EEO File currently available?

A: Yes. Most of the basic data contained in the 1990 EEO File is available from several sources, such as the two volume CD that was produced by the Bureau of Census and found in many libraries. The basic 1990 EEO File data is also available via the Internet at the following Census website: http://censtats.census.gov/eeo/eeo.shtml. Data from the 1990 Special EEO File, in addition to the basic EEO File data, is still available from private vendors.

Q: Will the 2000 Special EEO File be available from the American FactFinder on the Census website?

A: The 2000 Special EEO File will primarily be available as datasets. Currently, the Federal Consortium intends to have the Bureau of Census create a means for accessing some of the basic information contained within the Special EEO File via the internet.

Q: Is any Census 2000 data available by race, ethnicity and occupation?

A: As Census 2000 Summary File 4 (SF-4) data becomes available by state, race and ethnic data will be available for the following occupational categories:

  • Management, professional, and related occupations;
  • Service occupations;
  • Sales and office occupations;
  • Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations;
  • Construction, extraction, and maintenance occupations; and
  • Production, transportation, and material moving occpuations.

To access this data, begin by logging on to the Census' American FactFinder main page (http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/BasicFactsServlet) and then select the 2000 Summary File 4. Next, choose the Quick Tables option to the right of the Census 2000 Summary File 4 (SF 4) - Sample Data selection. Then, after selecting the state of interest, go to the next page and select DP-3. Profile of Selected Economic Characteristics: 2000. Finally, on the Quick Table tab labeled "Change Selections," choose "Race or Ethnic Groups" and proceed.

Q: In what format will the 2000 Special EEO File be made available?

A: At present, the Consortium agencies expect to receive 24 datasets that will constitute the 2000 Special EEO File. The general public will not be able to use these files or datasets easily. Therefore, public sector agencies and other organizations must develop software, so that the data from these files can be easily retrieved. However, as a aid in this process, the datasets will be available in more than one format, such as SAS and ASCII. The details as to how the Consortium or others obtain these datasets has not been finalized at this time; however, both the Federal Consortium and the Bureau of the Census are developing plans to make these datasets available upon request.

Q: Will occupational data be available for state governments or other municipalities?

A: Yes. In addition to the data that will be available for the 472 detailed occupational categories, the Department of Justice has had the Bureau create a set of eight job categories into which the 472 detailed occupational categories have been assigned. These eight categories are comparable to those found on the annual EEOC Form 164 for state and local governments (EEO-4).

Q: Will occupational data be available for federal agencies?

A: Yes. In addition to the 472 detailed occupational categories, the Office of Personal Management has had the Bureau create a set of 268 occupational categories on the EEO File to be used in some federal programs.

Q: What is the difference among worksite/residence, worksite and residence datasets?

A: The worksite/residence and worksite datasets contain information based on where people work and the residence datasets are based on where people live. The worksite/residence datasets focus on where people work but provide additional information on the geographic areas from which workers commute.

Q: Will county data be available as it was for past EEO Files?

A: No. As the majority of the datasets in the 2000 Special EEO File contain very detailed information, the Bureau of Census will not provide data for counties of less than 50,000 in population (or 100,000 in some instances) due to confidentiality concerns. For example, for worksite/residence datasets that contain information by 471 or 268 detailed occupational categories, data for all counties will not be available. However, for residence datasets with aggregated occupational categories, such as the 14 EEO occupational groups, data will be available for all counties.

Q: Is there a list of places that will not be included on the 2000 Special EEO File worksite datasets due to potential disclosure problems or a "balance of county" problem.

A: Yes. A listing of the sixty places with populations of 50,000 or more not shown in datasets 14 through 19 due to a "balance of the county" problem is available, as well as a listing of the thirty-four places with populations of 100,000 or more not shown in datasets 21 through 24 because of a "balance of the county" problem.

Q: How is the Civilian Labor Force (CLF) defined?

A: The Civilian Labor Force (CLF) is the sum of (1) the employed, at work during the enumeration week; (2) the employed, not at work during the enumeration week; and (3) the unemployed, including both experienced and new-entrant jobless who were seeking work.

Q: Does the 2000 Special EEO File contain a total for the Civilian Labor Force (CLF)?

A: From the residence datasets on the 2000 Special EEO File, a Civilian Labor Force (CLF) total can be calculated, as these files contain all the required data from each of the three components of the CLF specified immediately above.

From the worksite/residence or worksite datasets on the 2000 Special EEO File, a CLF total cannot be calculated, as these files do not include all the necessary information. The worksite/residence and worksite datasets do not include individuals in categories two and three above, as these individuals were either (1) employed but not at work during the enumeration-week with no opportunity to report a worksite on the Census form or (2) unemployed and, thus, without a worksite.

Q: Why do some datasets contain 471 occupational categories and others 472?

A: The worksite/residence and worksite datasets have 471 occupational categories and the residence datasets have 472. The difference is due to the unemployed or Code 992 that includes people 16 years and older with civilian work experience who are unemployed and have not worked since 1995; who have never worked and are looking for work; and who have worked since 1995, but whose last job was in the military, and are looking for civilian work. Code 992 is not applicable to worksite/residence and worksite tables. As the unemployed report a residence but not a worksite, they are not included in the worksite/residence and worksite datasets.

Q: Are the datasets with educational information based on workforce data or population data?

A: The datasets on the 2000 Special EEO File providing information on education are all based on civilian workforce data.

Q: Why do some federal forms use "Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander" and other federal publications use "Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander?"

A: In general, the "or" is used in questions for collecting race data and the "and" is for tabulating or displaying aggregated data.

Q: Why is the 2000 Special EEO File not being made available until 2003 when the data was collected in 2000?

A: As the 2000 Special EEO File is a special tabulation, the file was not expected to be produced until after the basic Census 2000 data tabulations. The 2000 Special EEO File will be one of the first non-standard tabulations to be created. Also, the data for the Special EEO File is derived from the Census 2000 long form that was not released until the Summer of 2002.

Q: How much did the 2000 Special EEO File cost to produce?

A: The overall cost for the 2000 Special EEO File will be slightly over $1,000,000 and will be equally split among the sponsoring agencies over two fiscal years. The 2000 Special EEO File was created through an interagency agreement between a Federal Consortium (consisting of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission; the Department of Justice; Civil Rights Section; Department of Labor, Office of Federal Contract Compliance; and the Office of Personnel Management) and the Bureau of the Census.

Q: Are any of the occupational groups split into sub-occupational groups based on other Census data, as was done in previous EEO Files?

A: No. The occupational categories for the 2000 Special EEO File will not be sub-divided based on additional Census data, such as type of industry or type of employment. For example, for the 1990 EEO File, Managers and Administrators (not elsewhere classified) and Supervisors and Proprietors (Sales) were split into self-employed and salaried; this type of split will not be done for the 2000 Special EEO File. In another example, for the 1990 EEO File, Laborers (except construction) were divided into occupational groups for durable and non-durable manufacturing and into other occupational categories for other industry divisions; this method of dividing occupational groups will not be done for the 2000 Special EEO File.


This page was last modified on December 15, 2003.