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PRESS RELEASE
7-31-17

EEOC Sues Cutter Mazda of Honolulu for Disability Discrimination

Applicant Denied Position Due to Hearing Impairment, Says Federal Agency

HONOLULU, Hawaii - The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has announced the filing of a lawsuit against Cutter Mazda of Honolulu alleging discrimination against a job applicant due to his disability. EEOC contends that Cutter Mazda denied an applicant a job based on his hearing impairment.

Such alleged conduct violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The EEOC filed suit in the U.S. District Court for the District of Hawaii (EEOC v. MJC, Inc. and GAC Auto Group, Inc. DBA Cutter Mazda of Honolulu, et al, Case No. 1:17-cv-00371) after first attempting to reach a pre-litigation settlement. The agency seeks back-pay, compensatory and punitive damages on behalf of the applicant, along with injunctive relief to prevent and address disability discrimination from happening in the future.

"Disability discrimination remains a persistent problem that needs more attention by employers," said Anna Park, regional attorney for the EEOC's Los Angeles District, which includes Hawaii in its jurisdiction.

Glory Gervacio Saure, director of the EEOC's Honolulu Local Office said, "Applicants should not be denied a position under the assumption that the individual cannot do the essential functions of the job."

MJC, Inc. and GAC Auto Group, Inc. DBA Cutter Mazda of Honolulu operates four automobile dealerships on the island of Oahu. According to their website, www.cuttermazdahonolulu.com, Cutter Mazda sells new and certified pre-owned vehicles, provides vehicle finance services, along with automobile repair parts and services.

Eliminating barriers in hiring, especially hiring practices that discriminate against people with disabilities, is one of six national priorities identified by the Commission's Strategic Enforcement Plan (SEP).

The EEOC advances opportunity in the workplace by enforcing federal laws prohibiting employment discrimination. More information is available at www.eeoc.gov. Stay connected with the latest EEOC news by subscribing to our email updates.