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2015 PAR: Appendices

Appendix A: Organization and Jurisdiction

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is a bipartisan Commission comprised of five presidentially-appointed members, including the Chair, and four Commissioners. The Chair is responsible for the administration and implementation of policy and the financial management and organizational development of the Commission. The Commissioners participate equally in the development and approval of Commission policies, issue charges of discrimination where appropriate, and authorize the filing of certain lawsuits. In addition to the Commissioners, the President appoints a General Counsel to support the Commission and provide direction, coordination, and supervision to EEOC's litigation program. A brief description of major program areas is provided on the following pages.

When the Commission first opened its doors in 1965, it was charged with enforcing the employment provisions of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964. EEOC's jurisdiction over employment discrimination issues has since grown and now includes the following areas:

  • Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, and national origin.
  • Pregnancy Discrimination Act,which amended Title VII to clarify that discrimination on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions constitutes sex discrimination and requires employers to treat pregnancy and pregnancy-related medical conditions as any other medical disability with respect to terms and conditions of employment, including health benefits.
  • Equal Pay Act of 1963 (included in the Fair Labor Standards Act), which prohibits sex discrimination in the payment of wages to men and women performing substantially equal work in the same establishment.
  • Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, which protects workers 40 and older from discrimination in hiring, discharge, pay, promotions, fringe benefits, and other aspects of employment. ADEA also prohibits the termination of pension contributions and accruals on account of age and governs early retirement incentive plans and other aspects of benefits planning and integration for older workers.
  • Title I and Title V of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended by the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008, which prohibits discrimination by private sector respondents and state and local governments against qualified individuals on the basis of disability.
  • Rehabilitation Act of 1973,which prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in the federal government.
  • Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, which prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of an applicant's or employee's genetic information, generally prohibits acquisition of genetic information from applicants and employees, and requires covered entities to keep such information confidential.
  • Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009, which overturned adverse Supreme Court precedent and restored the EEOC's long-held position on the timeliness of pay discrimination claims.

The Office of Field Programs, the Office of General Counsel, and 53 field offices, ensure that EEOC effectively enforces the statutory, regulatory, policy, and program responsibilities of the Commission through a variety of resolution methods tailored to each charge. Staff is responsible for achieving a wide range of objectives, which focus on the quality, timeliness, and appropriateness of individual, multiple victim, and systemic charges and for securing relief for victims of discrimination in accordance with Commission policies. Staff also counsel individuals about their rights under the laws enforced by EEOC and conduct outreach and technical assistance programs. The Office of General Counsel conducts litigation in federal district courts and in the federal courts of appeals.

Additionally, through the Office of Field Program's State and Local Program, EEOC maintains work sharing agreements and a contract services program with 94 state and local Fair Employment Practices Agencies (FEPAs) for the purpose of coordinating the investigation of charges dual-filed under state and local laws and federal law, as appropriate. EEOC partners with more than 60 Tribal Employment Rights Offices (TEROs) to promote equal employment opportunity on or near Indian reservations.

The Office of Legal Counsel develops policy guidance, provides technical assistance to employers and employees, and coordinates with other agencies and stakeholders regarding the statutes and regulations enforced by the Commission. The Office of Legal Counsel also includes an external litigation and advice division and a Freedom of Information Act unit.

Through its Office of Federal Operations, EEOC provides leadership and guidance to federal agencies on all aspects of the federal government's equal employment opportunity program. This office ensures federal agency and department compliance with EEOC regulations, provides technical assistance to federal agencies concerning EEO complaint adjudication, monitors and evaluates federal agencies' affirmative employment programs, develops and distributes federal sector educational materials and conducts training for stakeholders, provides guidance and assistance to EEOC administrative judges who conduct hearings on EEO complaints, and adjudicates appeals from administrative decisions made by federal agencies on EEO complaints.

EEOC receives a congressional appropriation to fund the necessary expenses of enforcing civil rights legislation, as well as prevention, outreach, and coordination of activities within the private and public sectors. In addition, EEOC maintains a Training Institute for technical assistance programs. These programs provide fee-based education and training relating to the laws administered by the Commission.

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Appendix B: Additional Information on EEOC Investigations and Litigation Requested by Congress

Investigations

The number of investigations initiated in fiscal year 2015 based on a directed investigation or Commissioner charge and the nature of the alleged discrimination.

In fiscal year 2015, EEOC initiated 14 investigations by Commissioner charges. These charges alleged:

  • testing and failure to hire on the basis of sex female
  • failure to hire based on race, black/African American
  • failure to hire based on disability
  • discriminatory terms and conditions of employment based on national origin
  • retaliation
  • work assignments and discharge based on sex, female
  • hiring, assignment, discipline and discharge based on sex, male, female, retaliation, national origin, and disability
  • recruiting and referring applicants and employees in ways that discriminate on the basis of race, sex, and national origin
  • revoking offers of employment based on race, sex, national origin, and retaliating against those who opposed such discriminatory practices
  • failure to promote based on sex, female, race, black/African American, and Hispanic
  • paying women and black/African American and Hispanic employees less than their white male counterparts
  • segregating employees into different job categories based on their sex, race, and national origin
  • discrimination in recruitment and hiring based on sex, race and national origin

In fiscal year 2015, EEOC initiated 225 directed investigations. These investigations alleged age discrimination in advertising, hiring, assignment, benefits, wages, terms and conditions, promotion, discharge, constructive discharge, involuntary retirement, and layoff and unequal pay based on sex.

The number of ongoing investigations, in fiscal year 2015, initiated by a directed investigation or Commissioner charge and the nature of the alleged discrimination.

In fiscal year 2015, there were approximately 111 ongoing investigations initiated by a Commissioner charge. These investigations alleged:

  • failure to hire on the basis of sex (female, male, pregnancy), race (black/African American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, bi-racial/multi-racial), national origin (Hispanic, Mexican), disability
  • discriminatory advertisements based on sex (female, male)
  • discriminatory terms and conditions of employment based on national origin, disability, race (African American/black)
  • retaliation
  • harassment based on sex (female), race (African American/black), and national origin (Hispanic)
  • assignment, discipline and discharge based on sex (male, female), race, national origin, and disability
  • testing which discriminated on the basis of sex (female), national origin (Hispanic, Mexican), race (black/African American, Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, bi-racial/multi-racial, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander)
  • recruiting and referring applicants and employees in ways that discriminate on the basis of race, sex, and national origin
  • revoking offers of employment based on race, sex, national origin
  • failing to promote based on sex, female, color, race, black/African American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian/Pacific Islander, and national origin, Hispanic, Arab, Afghani or Middle-Eastern, East Indian, Mexican
  • paying women and black/African American and Hispanic employees less than their White male counterparts
  • segregating employees into different job categories based on their sex, race, and national origin
  • harassment on the basis of sex, race (black/African American)
  • discriminating in recruitment based on sex, race and national origin
  • disability discrimination in assignment, testing, discharge, harassment, layoff
  • medical inquiries prohibited by the ADA including medical exams
  • failure to accommodate disabilities
  • assignment, segregated facilities based on race (African American/black)
  • failure to reinstate, discipline, discharge and intimidation in retaliation for protected activity
  • segregation based on sex, (male and female)
  • discharge, failure to accommodate, suspension different terms and conditions of employment based on color, national origin, race (bi-racial/multi-racial), religion (Muslim)
  • genetic and disability discrimination in discharge, hiring, testing, and terms and conditions of employment
  • discrimination on the basis of language/accent
  • assignment, discharge, discipline, on the basis of race, Asian; basing compensation on sex (female), national origin (Hispanic) and retaliation for engaging in protected activity
  • recruitment, hiring, based on race and national origin (non-Hispanic)
  • discriminatory benefits based on disability and record keeping violations

In fiscal year 2015, there were approximately 317 ongoing investigations initiated by a directed investigation. These investigations alleged age discrimination in advertising, hiring, assignment, referral, testing, benefits, wages, harassment, terms and conditions, promotion, discharge, constructive discharge, involuntary retirement, and lay off and unequal pay based on sex.

Litigation

The number of lawsuits filed in fiscal year 2015 based on a directed investigation or Commissioner charge.

EEOC filed three lawsuits this year based at least in part on a Commissioner charge or directed investigation.

  • EEOC v. United Parcel Service(based on two individual charges and a Commissioner charge filed by former Commissioner Stuart Ishimaru)
  • EEOC v. Source One Staffing(based on two Commissioner charges filed by Commissioner Chai Feldblum)
  • EEOC v. Glenwood Hook & Ladder et al. (based on an individual charge and five directed investigations).

Descriptions of these cases may be found in the Systemic Litigation section of this appendix.

Final attorneys' fees awarded against EEOC in which the defendant prevailed on the merits.

Attorney's fees were awarded against the agency based on the defendant having prevailed on the merits of the suit in three cases.

EEOC v. RJB Properties, Civil Action No. 1:10cv2001 (N.D. Ill.) -- On March 31, 2010, EEOC filed suit alleging that two defendants subjected a class of employees to a hostile work environment, various other discriminatory terms and conditions of employment, and discharge based on their national origin, and retaliated against a class of employees for filing charges of discrimination, in violation of Title VII. On May 1, 2013, EEOC entered into a consent decree with one of the two defendants providing $360,000 to ten aggrieved individuals and broad injunctive relief. On February 7, 2014, the district court ruled that EEOC's overtime and failure to promote claims against the other defendant became frivolous after additional facts were revealed in discovery. On June 16, 2014, the district court ordered EEOC to pay attorney's fees. EEOC filed an appeal to the 7thCircuit. On March 6, 2015, while on appeal, the parties agreed that EEOC would pay $35,000 in fees and costs.

EEOC v. Memphis Health Center, Civil Action No. 2:08cv2642 (W.D. Tenn.) -- On September 30, 2008, EEOC filed suit alleging that defendant failed to hire an applicant because of her age and because she had complained that her earlier lay off was discriminatory, in violation of the ADEA. On September 10, 2010, the district court granted defendant's motion for summary judgment against EEOC. On September 23, 2011, the district court ordered EEOC to pay fees based on the magistrate's finding that a prevailing party may recover fees against EEOC under the Equal Access to Justice Act (EAJA), that EEOC's two claims should be examined separately to determine if each was substantially justified, and that one of the claims was substantially justified while the other was not. On May 20, 2013, the 6thCircuit affirmed that a prevailing party may recover fees from EEOC under the EAJA in ADEA cases, but remanded the case to the district court to conduct the proper analysis of whether EEOC's position as a whole was substantially justified. On July 7, 2014, the district court again determined that the defendant is entitled to fees, and on April 14, 2015, the court ordered EEOC to pay fees and costs. EEOC filed another appeal to the 6thCircuit. EEOC and the defendant reached a settlement in which EEOC agreed to pay $90,000 and dismissed its appeal on September 9, 2015.

The number of cases of systemic discrimination brought in court by EEOC under section 706 or 707 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

EEOC initiated 16 systemic suits this fiscal year:

Amsted Industries Inc. & Amsted Rail Co., Inc., Civil Action No. 3:14-cv-1292 (S.D. Ill. filed Nov. 20, 2014) - EEOC alleges that defendant manufacturing companies refused to hire a class of applicants with disabilities based on a record of carpal tunnel syndrome or based on the results of a nerve conduction test, in violation of the ADA.

Lawler Foods, Civil Action No. 4:14-cv-3588 (S.D. Tex. filed Dec. 16, 2004) - EEOC alleges that defendant wholesale bakery engaged in a pattern or practice of refusing to hire black and non-Hispanic applicants for productionand laborer positions based on race and national origin, in violation of Title VII.

Seasons 52 Fresh Grill, Civil Action No. 1:15-cv-20561 (S.D. Fla. filed Feb. 12, 2015) - EEOC alleges that defendant restaurant chain engaged in a pattern or practice of refusing to hire individuals aged 40 and older based on age, in violation of the ADEA.

Valley Life, Civil Action No. 2:15-cv-340 (D. Az. filed Feb. 25, 2015) - EEOC alleges that defendant health care provider discharged a class of employees with disabilities pursuant to its inflexible maximum leave policy rather than providing additional leave as a reasonable accommodation. In addition, EEOC alleges that defendant failed to provide other reasonable accommodations to employees with disabilities and failed to maintain confidential employee medical files, in violation of the ADA.

Source One Staffing, Inc., Civil Action No. 1:15-cv-1958 (N.D. Ill. filed Mar. 4, 2015) - EEOC alleges that defendant temporary staffing firm subjected a class of applicants to unlawful, pre-employment disability-related inquiries, maintained a policy which required applicants to disclose disability-related information, used a qualification standard that screened out individuals with disabilities, and failed to hire individuals based on disability, in violation of the ADA. In addition, EEOC alleges that defendant failed to refer a class of employees for certain job assignments in compliance with discriminatory client requests based on race and national origin, in violation of Title VII.

Patterson UTI Drilling, Civil Action No. 1:15-cv-600 (D. Colo. filed Mar. 24, 2015) - EEOC alleges that defendant oil drilling company subjected black, Hispanic and Native American employees to a hostile work environment based on race and national origin, as well as discriminatory terms and conditions of employment, in violation of Title VII. In addition, EEOC alleges that defendant subjected a class of employees to retaliatory actions because of their discrimination complaints.

Plasma Biological Services, Civil Action No. 2:15-cv-2419 (W.D. Tenn. filed Jun. 22, 2015) - EEOC alleges that defendant plasma service company maintains a practice of discharging and refusing to hire any individual who tests positive for a viral marker, and that defendant fails to maintain confidential employee medical files, in violation of the ADA. EEOC alleges that defendant fired a phlebotomist because it incorrectly perceived him as having a disability based on the results of a viral marker test.

Crothall Services Group Corp., Civil Action No. 2:15-cv-3812 (E.D. Pa. Jul. 9, 2015) - EEOC alleges that defendant janitorial and facilities management company failed to comply with EEOC's recordkeeping regulations requiring employers to maintain records disclosing whether their selection procedures have a disparate impact on persons identifiable by race, ethnicity and sex, in violation of Title VII.

United Parcel Service, Civil Action No. 15-cv-4141, (E.D.N.Y. filed Jul. 15, 2015) - EEOC alleges that defendant package delivery company failed to provide exemptions from its nationwide appearance policy regulating men's facial hair as a reasonable accommodation for applicants and employees whose religion conflicts with the policy. EEOC alleges that defendant failed to hire and failed to promote individuals based on religion, in violation of Title VII.

Hillshire Brands Co., Civil Action No. 2:15-cv-1347 (E.D. Tex. filed Jul. 24, 2015) - EEOC alleges that defendant food processing company subjected a class of black production workers to a hostile environment based on race, in violation of Title VII.

Columbine Health Systems, Inc. & The Worthington, Inc. d/b/a New Mercer Commons Assisted Living Facility, Civil Action No., 15-cv-1597 (D. Colo. filed Jul. 27, 2015) - EEOC alleges that defendant health care service provider administered a written employment examination that had a disparate impact based on employees of African national origin, in violation of Title VII. In addition, EEOC alleges that defendant discharged four Africanemployees based on national origin, and subjected one employee to retaliatory actions because she complained of discrimination.

Magnolia Health Corp. et al., Civil Action No. 1:15-cv-1222 (E.D. Cal. filed Aug. 5, 2015) - EEOC alleges that defendant health care group refused to hire a class of applicants based on disability or perceived disability, in violation of the ADA. EEOC alleges that defendant used qualification standards that screen out individuals with disabilities by assigning unnecessary medical restrictions during the post-offer physical examination and revoking offers on the basis of those assigned restrictions. In addition, EEOC alleges that defendant failed to provide reasonable accommodations to employees with disabilities.

Sensient Dehydrated Flavors Co. et al., Civil Action No. 1:15-cv-1431 (E.D. Cal. filed Sep. 22, 2015) - EEOC alleges that defendant dehydrated vegetable producer discharged a class of employees with disabilities pursuant to its inflexible maximum leave policy rather than providing additional leave as a reasonable accommodation, in violation of the ADA. In addition, EEOC alleges that defendant discharged employees because they used leave as a reasonable accommodation, and refused to allow employees with disabilities to return to work after being released with no restrictions.

Charlton Methodist Hospital, Civil Action No. 3:15-cv-3104 (N.D. Tex. filed Sep. 24, 2015) - EEOC alleges that defendant healthcare facility maintained a policy of denying reassignment as a reasonable accommodation by requiring qualified individuals with disabilities to compete for open positions, in violation of the ADA. EEOC alleges that the defendant refused to reassign an employee with a disability to a vacant position for which she was qualified and required her to compete with other applicants.

Day & Zimmerman, Civil Action No. 3:15-cv-146 (D. Conn. filed Sep. 28, 2015) - EEOC alleges that defendant power industry staffing firm engaged in unlawful retaliation and inference with ADA rights by publicizing the details of an employee's charge of discrimination to around 150 electricians in his union hiring hall, in violation of the ADA.

Glenwood Hook & Ladder et al., Civil Action No. 2:15-cv-5592 (E.D.N.Y. filed Sep. 29, 2015) - EEOC alleges that defendant towns and fire rescue company refused to allow volunteer firefights aged 55 and older to accrue service credit towards a service benefit under the fire company's length of service award program based on age, in violation of the ADEA.

EEOC's success rate at the appellate level in fiscal year 2015.

On merits cases, EEOC prevailed in five appeals; EEOC did not prevail in five appeals.

Appendix C: Biographies of the Chair, Commissioners and General Counsel

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Jenny R. Yang, Chair

Ms. Yang was named Chair by President Barack Obama on September 1, 2014. She was first nominated to serve on the Commission by President Obama on August 2, 2012, and was unanimously confirmed by the Senate on April 25, 2013, to serve a term expiring July 1, 2017. She had served as Vice Chair of the EEOC since April 28, 2014.

As a member of the Commission and Vice Chair, Yang has led a comprehensive review of the agency's systemic program, which addresses issues of alleged discrimination that have broad impact on an industry, profession, company or geographic area. She also represents the agency on the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders and on the White House Equal Pay Enforcement Task Force.

Yang was a partner of Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll PLLC. She joined the firm in 2003, and has represented employees across the country in numerous complex civil rights and employment actions. As chair of the firm's hiring and diversity committee, Yang has experience with the myriad issues employers confront in making hiring and other personnel decisions.

Yang received her B.A. from Cornell University in Government. She received her J.D. from New York University School of Law, where she was a Note and Comment Editor of the Law Review and a Root-Tilden Public Interest Scholar.

For more information about Chair Yang, please see: http://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/yang.cfm


Constance S. Barker, Commissioner

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Commissioner Constance S. Barker

Constance Smith Barker has been a member of the Commission since 2008. She was nominated by President George W. Bush on March 31, 2008, and unanimously confirmed by the Senate on June 27, 2008 to serve the remainder of a five-year term expiring on July 1, 2011. On May 19, 2011, Ms. Barker was nominated by President Barack Obama to serve a second term to expire on July 1, 2016. The nomination to the second term was unanimously confirmed by the United States Senate on September 26, 2011.

Prior to her appointment to the Commission, Barker was a shareholder for 13 years at the law firm of Capell & Howard, P.C. in Montgomery, Alabama. As a member of the firm's Labor and Employment Section, she provided advice and counsel to businesses and defended businesses sued for employment discrimination. She also provided training on state and federal employment discrimination laws. Her public sector experience includes serving for four years as a prosecutor in the 11th Judicial Circuit and later in the 13th Judicial Circuit of Alabama. As an Assistant District Attorney she tried numerous jury and bench trials. Barker also served for 11 years as General Counsel to the Mobile County Public School System, a large city and county school system. She also served as a part-time municipal judge for two municipalities in Mobile, Ala. and was actively involved in Mobile's juvenile justice system.

A native of Florence, Ala., Barker was awarded a juris doctor from the University of Alabama School of Law in 1977. She received a bachelor's degree from Notre Dame University in 1973, where she was in the first class of women to graduate from that previously all-male institution. While at Notre Dame, she also studied for a year in Angers, France at l'Université Catholique de l'Ouest.

For more information about Commissioner Barker, please see: www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/barker.cfm


Chai R. Feldblum, Commissioner

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Commissioner Chai Feldblum
Chai R. Feldblum was nominated to serve as a Commissioner of the EEOC by President Barack Obama in September 2009. Following a recess appointment in March 2010, Ms. Feldblum was confirmed by the Senate in December 2010 for a term ending on July 1, 2013. In May 2013, Ms. Feldblum was nominated by President Barack Obama for a second term and was confirmed by the Senate in December 2013 for a term ending on July 1, 2018.

Prior to her appointment to the EEOC, Feldblum was a Professor of Law at the Georgetown University Law Center where she had taught since 1991. At Georgetown, she founded the Law Center's Federal Legislation and Administrative Clinic, a program designed to train students to become legislative lawyers. As Co-Director of Workplace Flexibility 2010, Feldblum worked to advance flexible workplaces in a manner that works for employees and employers. She also previously served as Legislative Counsel to the AIDS Project of the American Civil Liberties Union. In this role, she developed legislation, analyzed policy on various AIDS-related issues, and played a leading role in drafting the ground-breaking Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Later, as a law professor, she was equally instrumental helping in the passage of the ADA Amendments Act of 2008.

Feldblum has also worked on advancing lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights and has been a leading expert on the Employment Nondiscrimination Act. She clerked for Judge Frank Coffin of the First Circuit Court of Appeals and for Supreme Court Justice Harry A. Blackmun after receiving her J.D. from Harvard Law School. She received her B.A. degree from Barnard College.

For more information about Commissioner Feldblum, please see: www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/feldblum.cfm


Victoria A. Lipnic, Commissioner

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Victoria A. Lipnic, Commissioner
Victoria A. Lipnic was nominated to serve as a Commissioner of the EEOC by President Barack Obama on November 3, 2009. She was nominated for a term ending on July 1, 2010, was confirmed by the Senate for a second term ending on July 1, 2015, and has been nominated by President Obama for a third term.

Immediately before coming to EEOC, Lipnic was of counsel to the law firm of Seyfarth Shaw LLP in its Washington, DC, office. She brings a breadth of experience working with federal labor and employment laws, most recently as the U.S. Assistant Secretary of Labor for Employment Standards, a position she held from 2002 until 2009. In that position, Lipnic oversaw the Wage and Hour Division, the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, the Office of Workers' Compensation Programs, and the Office of Labor Management Standards. Under her tenure, the Wage and Hour Division revised regulations regarding overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act, reissued regulations under the Family and Medical Leave Act, and the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs issued new guidance and regulations for evaluating compensation discrimination.

A native of Carrolltown, Penn., where her late father was a teacher and long-serving mayor, Lipnic earned a B.A. degree in Political Science and History from Allegheny College and a J.D. degree from George Mason University School of Law.

For more information about Commissioner Lipnic, please see: www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/lipnic.cfm



P. David Lopez, General Counsel

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P. David Lopez was sworn in on April 8, 2010, as General Counsel of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). He was nominated by President Obama on Oct. 22, 2009, and given a recess appointment on March 27, 2010, and confirmed by the Senate on December 22, 2010. He was confirmed a second time by the Senate on December 3, 2014.

Lopez is the first field staff attorney to be appointed as General Counsel, having served in the Commission for 15 years in the field and at headquarters. Prior to his appointment, Lopez was a Supervisory Trial Attorney at the Commission's Phoenix District Office, where he oversaw the litigation of a team of trial attorneys. When he initially joined the Commission 1996, he served as Special Assistant to then-Chairman Gilbert F. Casellas in Washington, D.C. In this capacity, he advised Chairman Casellas on policy and litigation matters and helped develop the agency's strategic plan for development of pattern or practice cases.

Immediately prior to joining the Commission, Lopez was a Senior Trial Attorney with the Civil Rights Division, Employment Litigation Division, of the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. In this capacity, he litigated employment discrimination cases against state and local governments in numerous jurisdictions throughout the United States on behalf of the Department of Justice.

Lopez graduated from Harvard Law School in 1988 and graduated magna cum laude from Arizona State University in 1985, with a B.S. in Political Science. He is married to Maria Leyva. They have three children, Javier David, Julian Diego and Luis Andres.

For more information about General Counsel Lopez, please see: www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/lopez.cfm

 

 

Appendix D: Glossary of Acronyms

 

ADA Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990
ADAAA Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008
ADEA Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967
ADR Alternative Dispute Resolution
AJ Administrative Judge
CFO Chief Financial Officer
CHCO Chief Human Capital Officer
DMS Document Management System
EEO Equal Employment Opportunity
EEOC Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
EPA Equal Pay Act of 1963
EXCEL Examining Conflicts in Employment Laws
FEPA Fair Employment Practice Agency
FLSA Fair Labor Standards Act
FMFIA Federal Managers Financial Integrity Act
FOIA Freedom of Information Act
FTE Full-Time Equivalent
GINA Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008
GSA General Services Administration
IIG Intake Information Group
IFMS Integrated Financial Management System
IMS Integrated Mission System
OFO Office of Federal Operations
OFP Office of Field Programs
OGC Office of General Counsel
OIG Office of Inspector General
OMB Office of Management and Budget
OPM Office of Personnel Management
PMA President's Management Agenda
PCHP Priority Charge Handling Procedures
TAPS Technical Assistance Program Seminar
TERO Tribal Employment Rights Offices
UAM Universal Agreement to Mediate

Appendix E: Internet Links

EEOC:
http://www.eeoc.gov/

Past EEOC Performance and Accountability Reports
http://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/plan/archives/annualreports/index.cfm

EEOC Strategic Plan:
http://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/plan/strategic_plan_12to16.cfm

EEOC FY 2015 Performance Budget:
http://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/plan/2015budget.cfm

Past EEOC Performance Budgets:
http://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/plan/archives/budgets/index.cfm

EEOC Annual Report on the Federal Workforce:
Part I (2012) http://www.eeoc.gov/federal/reports/fsp2012/index.cfm
Part II (2011) http://www.eeoc.gov/federal/reports/fsp2011_2/index.cfm

EEOC Open Government Plan:
http://www.eeoc.gov/open/index.cfm

EEOC Statistics:
http://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/statistics/index.cfm

Appendix F: EEOC Field Offices